From HackCollege: 10 Memorization Tips for More Effective Study Sessions

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“Study” by Judit Klein

HackCollege has come out with yet another usable and informative post to help students at all levels of higher ed make good use of their study time: 10 Memorization Tips for More Effective Study Sessions

Dominique Jackson tells us the how and why to switch to audio, put it in your own words, visualize it, use acronyms, link information, skim readings, use distributed practice, teach information to someone else, and use flashcards.

Flashcards: One of the oldest tricks in the book, yet some people still don’t know how to use them properly. The point of notecards is to help you recall important information by memorizing the main points associated with key terms or concepts. You should not be writing full paragraphs on notecards.

A helpful technique is to write a question on the front, and then the answer on the back. The answer should be short and concise — not a detailed explanation. That way, when you see questions on your test, you can easily recall the main points from the notecard you memorized. There are some great sites that allow you to create sharable flashcards online and browse through preexisting flashcards. … One of my favorite sites to study flashcards on is Quizlet. I have seen a lot of exam questions on the flashcards I studied from the site.

This post is worth your time if you have information to memorize for an exam, or you need to help another student study.

Fourteen Ways to Stay Calm When You’re Starting School

Fourteen Ways to Stay Calm When You’re Starting School
1. Breathe. Look around and enjoy where you are right this minute. -Tracy Mendham, Coordinator of Learning Assistance, Center for Academic Excellence
2. Choose just a few important activities your first year. Don’t take on too much at once or overextend yourself. Kirsti Bogaard, Graduate Assistant, Fitzwater Center
3. Don’t worry about not knowing anyone – neither does anyone else. -Jeff Ogden, Coordinator of Student Accessibility Services, Center for Academic Excellence
4. Don’t be quick to follow the crowd. Choose your own path. –Doug Carty, Director, Campus Recreation
5. Find out who your academic advisor is and when you should talk to them. -Terri Downing, Coordinator of Advising, Director, Center for Academic Excellence
6. Get enough sleep. Jill Wixom, Circulation Manager, DiPietro Library
7. Get into a schedule or routine so you don’t get overwhelmed. You may want to continue your high school schedule in college. –Brittany Nyzio, Graduate Assistant, Fitzwater Center
8. Get off Facebook and do your work! -Patti Vorfeld, Coordinator of Academic Support Programs, Center for Academic Excellence
9. Go to a quiet place like the Spiritual Life Center, walk the campus trails, sit by the water, connect with trusted people. Bill Beardslee, Associate Director for Student Involvement and Spiritual Life
10. Lay on the grass in a quiet place and feel the sun and the breeze and just listen to the birds. -Rebecca Weidner, Administrative Assistant, Center for Academic Excellence
11. Make your room a more comfortable place to work and relax—a good light, good chair, nice art and plants. –Ross McKinley, Student Manager, Center for Academic Excellence
12. Save everything to the cloud. Skydrive is your new best friend. Stephanie Loiselle, Library Assistant, DiPietro Library
13. Stay organized. Be prepared. -Maureen Baptiste, Language Skills Specialist, Center for Academic Excellence
14. Use a planner for your homework, upcoming tests and projects, school events, work schedule, and vacation times. You’ll never forget a thing! -Meagan Shackelford, Tutor, Student Manager, Center for Academic Excellence

Writing Help by Phone with Join.me

Originally posted on Tracy Mendham:

Join.me Banner Image

Yesterday I had a successful writing help session with a student over the phone using a screen-sharing program called Join.me. With Join.me I could show the student what was on my screen just by emailing her a link for her to click on. Following the link, she could see my computer screen in her browser window. I brought up the Word document she had emailed me, and I could scroll around in the paper so we were both looking at the same thing at the same time as we discussed possibilities for global revision of her paper.

Screen sharing was even more helpful when we were discussing mechanical issues like in-text citations, reference lists, and headers. If a picture is worth a thousand words, live video is worth a million when you’re trying to talk where you’d put a signal phrase, format a citation, or have Word automatically insert…

View original 96 more words

Google Something Beautiful

A few years ago Google quietly unveiled a new search tool, Google Cultural Institute, which lets you search, explore, save, organize, and share images of art and culture from around the world. It’s really quite beautiful, and could offer inspiration or topics for students writing about fine art, history, and many other topics. Check out the video above, or go to http://www.google.com/culturalinstitute.

Group editing just got easier

Group projects can be a pain when you have to edit a collaborative essay etc. With Redliner students can upload any document and edit a document together. The changes will automatically appear to the next person who reads the document.

        “Eliminate the frustrations of change tracking and version control within critical documents such as contracts, press releases, ad copy, and other group editing projects.”

Take advantage of this tool to eliminate group editing frustration.

-Frangelica

How to focus with a Mac

Distractions often occur when students are trying to write a paper. There is Facebook, e-mail, or ESPN online. Either way, distractions can be annoying and stop and hinder the writing process. Students who have Mac should give WriteRooma try. This download tak

Write Room

Image courtesy of site post is linked to

es up the entire screen to prohibit distractions. Students will be forced to focus on the task at hand.

For Mac & iPhone users to write without distractions. WriteRoom is a full screen writing environment. Unlike the cluttered word processors you’re used to, WriteRoom lets you focus on writing.”

 

It’s a shame that this is only available for Mac users, but for those who do have Macs this program might be the solution.

-Frangelica

You mean, that doe’snt go…: go here;?

Not everyone is a whiz at punctuation and grammar. Thankfully there is Blue Book which offers rules and examples of what types of punctuation goes where. There are even free online quizzes to test your knowledge.

Rule 1. To avoid confusion, use commas to separate words and word groups with a series of three or more. Example: My $10 million estate is to be split among my husband, daughter, son, and nephew. Omitting the comma after son would indicate that the son and nephew would have to split one-third of the estate.”

Use this site to improve your punctuation and grammar or to double-check something for an essay or assignment.

-Frangelica

Blue Book: of Grammar and Punctuation

Image courtesy of site post is linked to

Opposing Views

For students who have to write an essay using an opposing view or have to do a debate with the class will find Opposing Views useful. The site offers various views on a number of issues.

Opposing Views helps you uncover all sides of the issues you care about most. Here at www.opposingviews.com, experts go head-to-head on real-life concerns, debating news and events, addressing the questions that keep you up at night. We introduce the questions, the experts present their cases (and disagree with each other), and you leave ready to make well-informed decisions and take action.”

The website offers interesting points of views and will make you think critically about the issue at hand. Great place to start for essays!

-Frangelica

Ahem… Where’s my introduction?

Writing an introduction to an essay can be the most difficult part of the writing process. Fear not though! University Blog has written this post to help even the most down trodden students write an introduction.

 

“A good introduction should pull the reader straight in and make them want to read more. Also, learning how to write a good introduction can be very helpful in overcoming “starting anxiety,” one of the major causes of writer’s block.”

 

Students should really consider bookmarking this page to refer to over and over again.

-Frangelica

Celebrities Confront Procrastination

Both videos end with a certain lack of closure. But procrastinators, you are not alone! Get hold of this time-killer before it undermines your academic progress. Scheduling study time, keeping a master calendar with due dates for course assignments, and keeping track of your grades and course standing can help you be accountable to yourself and successful.

Image of Sponge Bob writing at desk

Spongebob Squarepants: Typical American Procrastinator

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